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Stay save! WOW I felt one too several years ago. I was typing and my chair rolled away from the desk. Way too scary!!! My daughter lives in Durham. She was asleep and didn't feel it, but my former neighbor in Chapel Hill felt it. I'm sure it wasn't on anybody's bingo card! I so firmly remember knowing the end of summer was near when the bright greens of early summer turned to the silvery greens of late summer.

We are in So. Thanks for the lovely pictures. We have had quite a few earthquakes up in the Stanley area here in Idaho. I would rather have earthquakes than hurricanes! Until Yellowstone blows! We felt the ground move all the way up here in Long Island, NY yesterday! It was just a feeling of the ground vibrating a bit, but my hubby thought something was wrong with our house! I thought of you when I heard about the earthquake.

Glad all is okay with you. What would all your followers do without Zoey to entertain us and make us giggle! When I am starting to feel down, I search out your videos of Miss Zoey. She is the best!!! I was glad to read that the earthquake avoided too much damage! I forgot about earthquakes after moving out of California! So happy I moved north! Oh my goodness those string blocks are beautiful. I can't wait to see the border attached.

The Blue Ridge Mountains are beautiful. Have a wonderful day Bonnie. We had an unpicked earthquake years ago when living in Maine. Took a minute to figure out what the heck it was. Glad to know that you are safe. My daughter lives in Graham and granddaughters live in Raleigh. They felt it too! There has not been an earthquake of that magnitude in NC in years, when I heard about it my first thoughts went to you out there in the mountains.

Glad to hear all is well. Love seeing those horses and I marvel at how you can just walk among them like friends on a path. Happy Sewing :0 Hope we get to see the foal when born I hope all is well in your area now. THank you for letting us know about the earthquake, it isn't on the news at all. I hope you and Zoey had a good walk. Not sure I would have ventured out, but I know you love the outdoors. I enjoy YOUR view. I am an indoor girl. Have fun, and thank you for all that you do, I love the views of your new quilt.

Zoey brightens all of our days. She is so darn cute and flexible. The quotes hit the nail on the head - good reminders for us all. Thank you.

I always get a laugh out of watching Zoey. I bet you can't step on your head! I bet you thought that you left all this nonsense behind when you moved across the country. But no. Wait NC has earthquakes. I've been avoiding the news. I get so tired of all the politics Obviously I'm clueless. Every year, thanks to my friend Deidre Miller Kaminski, a group of 50 to 70 of us enjoy the dance. We enjoy seeing each other, dancing with each other and seeing and dancing with people we know from those long ago years.

And the dance has been the crowning jewel to a great weekend that also featured the Plymouth Kielbasa Festival, which, of course, has also been canceled for The pandemic has wreaked havoc on just about everything and everybody. It is difficult to cope with this pandemic. We all want to have it go away now so we can return to that normal life. We have seen the number of cases continue to rise and far too many have died. We have to continue to wear masks, social distance and avoid large crowds.

I have known Joe Nardone and Eddie Day most of my life. They have been a part of my life that has always represented fun.

We will get through this pandemic and we will get our normal lives back — at least to a more tolerable level than what we have right now. When I take my evening ride, I often head out to Harveys Lake. You see on my very first ever day of school. It was Rockin And Rollin pretty cool school — a high wall wrapped around half of the schoolyard, forming a stadium-like atmosphere. When I saw all the other kids running around, I ran from my mom and joined the madness.

As I ran around the back end of the building, unbeknownst to me, Eugene Polak was running from the opposite direction and for whatever reason — hey, we were kids — Eugene flipped a rock that caught me in the head.

I woke up in the nurses office, my head bandaged and my mom standing there. Mom took me home. I have the scar to support my position. We had first and second grade in that school, but I only got credit for completing first grade. This was a big school and we had good teachers. My favorite was and always will be Miss Marlyn Strongoski, who later became Mrs. She was my fourth grade teacher.

The highlight of fourth grade was a group of us winning a spelling bee. Miss Strongoski was so pleased, she invited us good spellers — and bad grammarians — over to her house for a little party. See the attached picture. This is evidence as to why I do not own any sweaters today. What was my mom thinking?

That is one ugly sweater. My memory had expunged that sweater from my mind. I recall me being the cool kid wearing button down shirts of light blue, yellow, dark blue, plaid and matching socks.

Yes, I had yellow socks. And Argyle patterns as well. Moms did that a lot back then. Not really, but effective in the battle against runny noses.

But what this picture shows is how different things were back then. We were all dressed nicely and we were polite. I also find it interesting that I am the only kid not looking at the camera. Maybe Miss Strongoski had a dog? Looking at that picture is consuming. I keep finding little details every time I look at it. I wish I had more pictures like this to stare at and remember good times of long ago. When I look at the length of my life, the first 18 years, for me, were the formative years.

Thanks to my mom and dad and the neighborhood. In this small bungalow home, we had a parlor, a living room, a kitchen, a pantry, three bedrooms and a bathroom. My room was just off the living room.

It was not that big. I had a bed, a dresser, a chest of drawers and a closet. And there were two windows that were always open during nice weather. My mom had two lilac trees in our side yard — a purple and a white — and the aroma was so welcoming. Our room was our sanctuary. It was where we went to be us — do our homework, study, read books — mostly comic books — practice guitar, sort baseball cards, listen to records, wait for Santa Claus. It was also where my mom would serve me ice cream for breakfast because she knew that was the only incentive for me to wake up and get ready for school.

We stayed on the front porch to play our games, or in the parlor, our front room, so to speak. These were simpler times, but they were special times as well. I would enjoy reading Archie and the Gang comics, or reading the backs of those Topps baseball cards. I can remember sitting on my bed and practicing my guitar. I was given exercises to develop calluses on my finger tips to allow for pressing down the strings to the frets without pain.

I would devote at least one hour every day to practicing the guitar. I never got to the point of a great guitar player, but I did learn and I had fun. But our room was where we went to when the day was done, or when it was raining, or when we just wanted some down time. And we each had things to do in our rooms. So as I slowed down on Reynolds Street, I stared at the windows that were part of my room —windows I had only looked out of, never into. I could smell the lilacs and I could see our old Cherry tree.

I could see my dad playing catch with me in the side yard as my mom hung clothes on the line. Many Pennsylvanians are not even aware their identities were stolen in the past until they receive correspondence or a debit card from our UC office.

I urge everyone to remain vigilant, recognize the scam warning signs, and know what to do if you become a victim. Pennsylvanians should be aware of the following potentially fraudulent activities related to unemployment compensation benefits:. Any employer that receives notice that a claim has been filed for one or more of your employees who continued working and were not laid off or otherwise unemployed. If any of these suspicious activities happen to you, do not assist or confront the fraudster.

Dan Meuser, R-Dallas, this week introduced the Stop Mail-In Voter Fraud Act — legislation aimed at protecting the integrity of elections in response to the adoption of new forms of voting during the coronavirus crisis and known abuses of mail-in voting methods:. Additionally, a fraudulent vote cancels out a legitimate vote cast by a law-abiding citizen, effectively suppressing that legitimate vote.

The Stop Mail-In Voter Fraud Act sends a clear warning to anyone thinking of tampering with mail-in ballots that they will be subject to significant penalties, possibly including jail time.

In keeping with their support for people wearing masks when they venture out to public places, Senators Toomey and Bennet are introducing a bipartisan resolution that highlights the growing evidence that mask wearing indoors, when social distancing is not an option, can help combat the spread of COVID Please, for the benefit of your neighbors, friends, and those who live in your community, wear a mask.

In Pennsylvania, This year marks the 22nd occasion of the United States Census, and commonwealth residents began receiving invitations to respond to the Census at the beginning of March. Pennsylvanians can respond online, by phone, or by mail, and this year marks the first time in history that responses can be filled out online. Pennsylvanians who have not responded to the Census should expect a Census enumerator in the coming days to assist with filling out the form.

Census workers will carry an official identification card and number for individuals to call and confirm their identity, if necessary. The Census questionnaire is confidential and straightforward, with questions that include your name, address, sex, race, ethnicity, Rockin And Rollin, and whether you own or rent your home.

The Census Bureau will never reach out to you on behalf of a political party. Your responses to the Census are protected by law and cannot be shared with, or used by, any other government agencies. Answers cannot be used for law enforcement purposes or to determine eligibility for government benefits or immigration enforcement.

We feed her apples. Bad Paw loves apples. I have a deep connection to Bad Paw. I have seen how she continues to live her life, despite having a bit of a disability that I am certain also causes her some pain. Neither of my parents ever allowed their disability to hinder them. They were always fully functional and they would never use their disability as an excuse.

My parents were far more functional than I was. So, as a result of witnessing their abilities all my young life, I gained a real appreciation of the abilities of people with disabilities. I tell you this because I think we all need to realize that people bring a lot to the table — all people. And we should never assume anything about a person with a disability.

As soon as Bad Paw hears my car door slam, she appears from under the deck. She stands 15 feet away and watches as I cut up the apples and toss them to her. These apples bring joy to bad paw. She devours two or three apples and she always looks for more. Bad Paw trusts me. But she trusts my friend more. My friend also fills a bowl with water for Bad paw to drink during these recent hot days and nights. Bad Paw has taught me not to feel sorry for her, which I must confess I still do.

She constantly shows us that she is fine. She runs and jumps like, well, like a deer. She is also a mommy, taking care of her baby just like any mommy would. When I look at Bad Paw, I talk to her. She stands and listens. She endures my gibberish only because she knows I will feed her apples. We should come up with another name, more fitting of the beautiful creature that she is. She likes to lay in the grass and sleep under the deck.

Bad Paw knows that she is loved and cared for and that she can count on getting a couple of apples almost every day. Yes, we accept Bad Paw for who she is — a beautiful, child-bearing deer who refuses to allow her disability to get in the way of living her life to the fullest.

My friend Walter Roman had a huge cherry tree in his yard that each year produced the most delicious black cherries. We would get up in the tree, find our special branch and then begin to pick the cherries and devour them. Across the street at my house, we have a different kind of cherry tree. These were red and yellow and called Rainier cherries.

And they were delicious as well. The glitch here was that our cherry tree was old and not very sturdy. We had to get a ladder and climb up with a pail and pick the cherries, then sit under the tree and eat them.

Look, we played hard back then. The summer heat never stopped us. We would run and play all day and ride our bikes, even. We would play Wiffle ball, stocking ball, up against and more.

On rainy days, we would play Strat-O-Matic on my front porch or flip our Topps baseball cards. There was something about it. We also had plum trees and peach trees, not to mention apple trees and grape vines. It was like a fresh fruit stand.

I brought them home, placed them in a colander and washed them off. I thought about sitting on my front porch playing Strat-O-Matic and flipping cards. And I thought about climbing cheery trees and eating them on a branch to escape the summer heat. I thought about how much good baseball has brought to my life and how following the Yankees was a passion for my dad. And now, so many years later, in the midst of this damn pandemic, I was able to find some comfort in those memories and in the game I have always loved.

Edwardsville and Larksville kids were now a part of Plymouth Area. That year of marked the beginning of a new era in local school districts and also marked the end of the era of hometown schools. Anyway, the merger happened and we resumed school with a whole bunch of new kids. The following year, kids from all nine towns that comprised WVW would attend one school. It was a huge adjustment — one that some have yet to fully accept. But it is what it is.

But looking at that picture of the Plymouth Area basketball squad brought back many memories of competitive practices. First of all, just look at that team. This was a talented group, for sure. And Coach Joe Evan was as good as it gets. Coach Evan knew basketball and he knew how to plan for every opponent. During the season, we were getting ready to play Dallas, who had an outstanding player named Mike Wilkes.

Coach Evan chose me to play the role of Mike Wilkes during our practices leading up to the game. He told me that whenever I got the ball, to shoot it. But it sure was fun. And Coach Evan made his point. He got the team to get to a mindset that whenever Mike Wilkes was gong to get the ball, he would look to shoot. As I look back on those years, and I see those great uniforms, red with black and white trim, I think of the Hickory Hoosiers of Hollywood fame.

We were them. Small band-box gymnasiums, overflow crowds and good, solid, fundamental basketball. Even the referees were part of the ambiance. He took me to St. But apparently, this was where nervous parents took their children to allow them to get behind the wheel of a two-ton machine with wheels. Dad pulled into the cemetery, stopped the car and put it in park.

I got in and adjusted the seat. Dad walked me through all the controls and buttons. I inched along the road, trying to stay in a straight line, and I negotiated the first turn. When we returned to our starting point, Dad said stop the car, put it in park and turn it off. I followed his instructions perfectly. We discussed my first lap around the cemetery.

We would return to the cemetery every evening for a week. My mom was not going to accompany us on this drive. She would never have been able to relax with me behind the wheel of our Plymouth Valiant, navy blue, push button transmission.

Mom said she was going to bake and make Sunday dinner and wished us luck. So I took a deep breath and set out, stopping for my first stop sign, which was 25 feet from our home. Dad said to drive by the Little League field on Wadham Street. I got there and parked the car while Dad went to check the press box.

I needed the time to gather my nerves again. When I got to the Narrows — a stretch of road that back in the day was known for cars racing in both directions — I have to admit I was a bit more than nervous. We returned home a bit later without a scratch on the Valiant, and Dad had not perspired all that much. More importantly, Dad never felt he had to scream.

I passed the written exam and failed the driving test. I also know that learning how to drive is not difficult — the hard part is learning how to co-exist with other drivers in heavy traffic. Back in the day, Plymouth High School had Mr. Gaise Lacek teach most of us how to drive. He taught us the rules of the road, and he took us in groups of three to drive around Plymouth.

Lacek helped us become better drivers. But it seemed to work. I would be sent to my room to wait for my dad to come home. It was not a fun time — waiting. All I could think about is whether I would live to see the next day. As I waited and waited, the fear grew inside me. What, I would ask myself, am I waiting for here?

When the waiting was over, I would hear my mom whispering to my dad. I would then hear him walking toward my bedroom door. It would open and my dad would look at me. Dad would then explain to me the situation and in a matter of minutes, the issue was cleared up and I had an extremely new perspective on right and wrong. Wait, what? Just tell me already. Did you get that new bike?

Or what? Come on, tell me. Waiting is never easy. Even when the wait is fun, like in anticipation of a fun thing, a trip, a gift, or an award. We have all had to wait. We have waited so long for that special person to enter our lives. We have waited years for our team to win that championship. We have waited to learn of that big promotion or job hiring. We have waited for the results of those finals.

We have waited for the birth of that child. Of course, the term hot dog has been applied to non-food issues as well. And we had plenty of hot dogs back in the day.

Most of them did receive a come-uppence of sorts. Whenever that happened, the crowd would roar. Owner Steve Mergo, a lanky man with a pleasant smile and a sense of humor, would grill the dogs right there in front of you. He would tell us that he put a little beer in the mustard — his secret ingredient, despite all of Plymouth knowing this potent potable fact. Steve kept the hot dog buns in drawers behind the counter. They were the freshest buns I have ever tasted. Steve would add onions or relish of you asked, but most of us just wanted that beer-laden mustard.

And a soda. And a bag of chips. It was where we stopped after a Saturdays afternoon matinee at the Shawnee Theater. It was where we went whenever we ventured downtown. I remember an interview I did years ago with a woman celebrating her th birthday.

I asked her what the secret to her longevity was, fully expecting her to tell me about her healthy diet, etc. She told me she ate at least one hot dog every day — not once a week or every month — every day.

That should create a jam-up at every ice cream joint in the area. If you go to the National Day website, you will see all of the celebrations for each day and you can plan accordingly. They are also pretty easy to find. In fact, some students celebrated hot dogs for an entire week. Hot dogs are mandatory when you attend a baseball game.

The National Day website tells us that hot dogs and baseball were officially paired together in St. Louis by the owner of the St. Louis Browns. He also distributed them at an amusement park he owned. And, the website claims, more than 9 billion hot dogs are sold each year in the United States — Americans eat approximately million hot dogs every July 4th.

No matter what level of baseball it is, Opening Day is when we have a parade, speeches, player introductions and more. All six teams would march in their flannel uniforms from Bull Run to Wadham Street. The Plymouth High School band would march Rockin And Rollin play and borough council members and the mayor would join in the festivities.

And when we all arrived at the field, the players would line up around the infield and a few people would speak. There would be a big crowd, mostly of parents and family and friends of the players, but also included the team sponsors and almost everybody from town. The biggest stage, of course, is Major League Baseball. Every major league team has a ceremonial first pitch thrown before every game.

Those chosen feel honored, as they should. Well, this year as Major League teams hold their openers, ceremonial first pitches will be tossed. But because of the ongoing, never-ending pandemic, there will not be any fans in the stands. So, there will not be any booing. According to an Associated Press story, Dr. The Nationals host the New York Yankees to open the season nearly four months after it originally was scheduled to begin.

This is the best choice Major League Baseball and the Nationals could have made to bestow this honor of throwing out the first pitch of the delayed start of the season. Fauci has been out front on the pandemic since the beginning.

He has had the public health safety at the top of his priority list. He should be given a standing ovation — even if we are standing in our self-isolating living rooms. There were engineers, architects, educators, administrators, businessmen, physicians, lawyers, salesmen, accountants, a few journalists, a swimming pool installer, Rockin And Rollin, college students, high school students, coaches, referees, and more. Each day as the Goons gathered, sides were chosen — the main objective was to split up the players so that a competitive game would be played on the court.

There were Goons that liked to play a team game and pass the ball to the open man, play defense, take an occasional shot and keep the score fairly. And there were others who if you passed them the rock, you had zero expectation of ever getting it back. The Goons were not exactly known for the vertical game.

There was one guy who would like to take half-court hook shots. And there was the Goon who stood in the three-second lane all the time. When the sides were chosen, nobody ever dared to suggest that one side be shirts and the other skins.

Nobody, and I mean nobody, wanted to see this group without shirts on, trust me. There were scuffles, but no bloodletting. There were arguments that were settled and joked about in the locker room. There were differences of opinions on certain calls, etc. The point here is that for 25 years the same bunch of Goons gathered to play their very own special brand of basketball and they enjoyed the challenges, the arguments, the differences of opinion and the overall experience of being a Goon.

And they were always there for each other. They became friends and they remain friends. They still gather and talk about those days and laugh at the games and the unusualness of the style the Goons displayed.

I am certain that most, if not all of the Goons would return to those days and play that lunchtime game again. We all stood in amazement, asking him where he got that. Bob Rockin And Rollin it was a team he had played on years before. We realized at that moment that The Goons had a history.

We were shocked. It was truly sad to see the decrepit condition of the Sterling, which in its heyday hosted many a memorable events. There is that iconic photograph of then-presidential candidate John F. Kennedy riding on the back of a convertible in waving to an overflow crowd as the motorcade passed the Sterling and its marquee.

In July ofPatrick Jordan brought his camera to the Hotel Sterling and he snapped picture after picture of the interior of the once-grand hotel. Jordan appeared to be a member of the media that accompanied then-U. Paul Kanjorski as he led a group of county and city officials on a tour of the Sterling. Jordan and his wife, the former Maureen Rowland, had recently celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary and Jordan recalled that glorious day. There were mirrors everywhere and chandeliers.

We had a great time. Jordan was standing in what was once called the Crystal Ballroom of the Sterling, site of many weddings and dinner parties. And officials were hopeful much of that grandeur would be returned to the downtown landmark. The restoration project never happened and inwater flooded the basement of the Sterling rendering it unsafe. In a matter of months, it was taken down. The Irem Temple of North Franklin Street is hoped to be saved by a group trying to raise the necessary funds to save it.

When these buildings are taken down, more than the architecture is lost. The memories of days of grandeur may remain, but the physical evidence is lost. We need to save these historical buildings so when people like Patrick Jordan want to take photos of the site of his wedding, the building will be there. And those buildings should not be standing in such disrepair that signals their impending demise. Take a look around and see all that remains of our history.

There are many buildings that hold such memories. In the mid- to late s the Wilkes College football program ran off 32 straight wins — the fourth longest streak in college football history at the time. Its success brought local and national notoriety to players, coaches and the school. The streak began in the fourth game of the season and ended in From a victory over Ursinus to a loss to Ithaca, Wilkes College football captured the hearts of Wyoming Valley and beyond.

There are many words to describe the Golden Horde — tough, talented, close-knit, magical, prepared, conditioned, determined. They all apply. Schmidt always said that his teams were just that — teams. He would acknowledge the abundance of individually talented players that wore the blue and gold, but he was reluctant to heap praise on them one by one.

He preferred to discuss them as a unit. When he left Wilkes, Schmidt was not associated with the school for many years. He and his wife, Marge, spent most of their retired days in Florida.

The Golden Horde can take credit for helping Wilkes grow. Schmidt coached the Colonels from His teams went winning five MAC titles, two Lambert Bowls best small college team in the East and one Timmie Award best small college team in the country. The 32 straight wins will be talked about whenever players and coaches get together to catch up and reminisce. Wiendl earned a letter in three sports — football, wrestling and baseball — in each of his four years at Wilkes from through The pressure we had on us to continue to win was unbelievable.

And I will tell you this — we fought as hard as we could all the way through that streak right up to the last game. Pawlush has written a book about Schmidt and his wife, Marge Schmidt, both deceased.

It should be noted that Coach Schmidt and his wife never had children. In the book, Pawlush talks about those Golden Horde years and how Schmidt molded them into an unbeatable team that became galvanized through one common goal — winning. The book brings the reader into the locker room and on to the sidelines. You get a real feel for what it was like to play for a legend — to be part of something very, very special.

Those days at Wilkes College were magical. From Dean Ralston leading the pep band to Art Hoover singing along to crowded bleachers and those blue-and-gold uniforms playing on a field tucked into a corner of America where no foe ever felt comfortable.

Then in October ofafter a year absence, Schmidt returned to the site of his triumphs. Many of his players showed up to show their respect and appreciation for their coach. Rachel Levine said. Individuals with complaints about a nursing home can file that complaint with the department in several ways.

Complaints can be made anonymously by calling Although annual inspections are not occurring at this time, extensions are in place according to guidance issued from the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services CMS. The majority of other surveys are still occurring, both virtually and on-site. Virtual surveys provide the same level of access but are doing virtually to minimize the spread of COVID New cases have increased over the past few weeks as facilities conduct universal testing to determine the prevalence of COVID The majority of these new cases are individuals who were asymptomatic.

The inspections, called surveys, include information on nursing home patient-care and building inspections. If a facility is cited for not following regulations during the survey, it must submit a plan of correction that includes what will be done to fix the issue and a completion date. The department will conduct a surprise follow-up inspection to ensure the issue is resolved.

Surveys are posted to the website 41 days after the survey is completed. The department also may issue a sanction. Possible sanctions include a civil penalty, a ban on admissions, a license being revoked, or a facility being put on a provisional license, which requires, among other things, being subject to additional inspections.

A provisional license can be renewed no more than three times. The department can return the facility to a regular license if it is satisfied that all issues have been corrected and it is warranted. The department maintains a searchable database, which allows the public to view patient care surveys, building safety surveys, size of the nursing home, type of ownership and additional information about each of the nursing homes in the state.

The department oversees nearly nursing homes and more than 88, beds within nursing homes in Pennsylvania, in addition to other facilities, including hospitals, ambulatory surgical facilities, home care agencies and others. The Wolf Administration has taken a three-pillar approach to protecting the vulnerable residents living in nursing homes and other long-term living settings from COVID Carroll said considering the financial challenges faced by communities such as Pittston due to the COVID impact, these significant grant funds will ensure this important infrastructure project is completed.

With the governor announcing further restrictions on already hurting restaurants and bars, Rep. This legislation would ease some of their worries and give them a sense of hope for the future. Large restaurant chains would be ineligible for grants under the program. As hot summer weather continues across the state, the Department of Health this week encouraged all Pennsylvanians to be aware of the dangerous impacts extreme heat can have on themselves and their neighbors, especially the elderly and other vulnerable populations.

We ask all Pennsylvanians to be a good neighbor and check on those who may have limited mobility or may not have a way to escape the heat. There are several groups of people who are at-risk of developing heat-related health conditions during high temperatures. Those groups include infants and young children, people 65 years of age and older, people with chronic medical conditions, and those who must work outdoors.

It is important to make sure these groups are monitored on hot days. Extremely hot weather can make you sick, and extreme heat is one of the leading causes of weather-related deaths in the United States each year. On July 1, Secretary Dr. Levine signed an order mandating mask-wearing. Individuals must wear face coverings unless wearing a face covering would create an unsafe condition in which to operate equipment or execute a task.

Face shields are an acceptable alternative to face masks when high temperatures and humidity create unsafe conditions.


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