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See 1 question about Come with Me…. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 2.

Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Come with Me. Nov 19, Chandra Claypool wherethereadergrows rated it it was ok. This book was entirely not what I expected it to be. Based on the synopsis I expected more in the way of multiverses and the experiences Amy would have as a guinea pig to Donny in his experiment.

This has been a subject that has always fascinated me. How many different lives could you be living - what if you had made different decisions While this book did touch on that, I felt it was not the focus at all during my read, which was disappointing.

There are a lo This book was entirely not what I expected it to be. There are a lot of characters to keep track of in this book and they're all interspersed with each other in one form or another.

I kept getting confused as to who belonged to whom and who was whose mother, etc. At times the story line changed from one character to another with no exact change over to let you know we were now looking through someone else's eyes.

Unfortunately I never connected to any of the characters. I especially wasn't interested in Dan's story line and wanted to drop kick him into next week. I'm not sure exactly what it was about him that just really got under my skin but he just did.

Then that ending for him. It's interesting that this is classified under sci-fi when it was such a minimal part of the book. I would put this more under domestic drama and it certainly doesn't fly in the dark comedy or deeply romantic love story that the synopsis leads you to believe in the last paragraph.

Maybe it was due to all this misleading that led me to not particularly care for this book. Maybe it was the disconnection I felt to every character. Or maybe it just wasn't a good fit for this reader. No matter which way, unfortunately this book just didn't jive with me. Thank you to Harper Books for this copy. View 2 comments. And like the best sci-fi, that part of the plot is really just a chance to consider our characters in more depth.

And while the startup-Silicon-Valley setting also plays an important role in the story, it's not the focus either. This should have all been just fine with Come With Me, but while I was four-stars for this book for much of the first half, it ended up falling down to three. The family at the center of the book is well-drawn, and the fact that the plot didn't really take off for a while didn't bother me at all.

I enjoyed spending time with them. I enjoyed Amy's take on the world, I enjoyed being in her head. The last third of the book involves several crises culminating together, which is a very real thing, but also meant that most of what's been happening at the book gets sidelined while one particular thing gets worked out.

The point of view also changes often, with many characters taking center stage only once, meaning that many of their stories feel unfinished. Ultimately I just wanted this to be more than it is, more than just the same story of a marriage we've seen many times before. I wanted the different points of view, the idea of the multiverse invention, the whole package to go up a level and take me somewhere.

I knew I was in a book by a skilled writer, but it felt more like a hodgepodge than a cohesive novel. I also have to note that this book is another in a trend I've noticed in the past couple of years.

It contains a trans character, that character is treated like a person, the character is allowed to be worth loving and worth desiring, but the way the character is written about especially with respect to the gender they were assigned at birth is problematic. But so much of the world remains ignorant on trans issues, and while this book may mean those audiences see trans people as more valid there are also things they may take away that are callous and insensitive, things you should never say or think!

I do not know how to solve this dilemma, since of course there will be characters who are ignorant on these issues, but it's a problem nonetheless and I would caution readers who are sensitive on this topic to at least go in with proper expectations. Dec 15, Julie Ehlers rated it really liked it Shelves: californiafree-libraryliterary-fiction.

It was a cowardly move, he knew, but he was a coward. As has already been established here on Goodreads, I was a big fan of Schulman's novel P. Initially, to my dismay, Come with Me seemed to have a lot in common with the latter book: Privileged white straight middle-aged married couple; wife in a constant state of feeling put-upon, husband completely clueless in the emotional intelligence department, teenage son depressingly pervy an It was a cowardly move, he knew, but he was a coward.

Initially, to my dismay, Come with Me seemed to have a lot in common with the latter book: Privileged white straight middle-aged married couple; wife in a constant state of feeling put-upon, husband completely clueless in the emotional intelligence department, teenage son depressingly pervy and self-centered, younger sibling s in need of protection from the well-meaning but oblivious adults around them.

Both novels also contain more viewpoints than seems strictly necessary for such short pp. I was so disappointed that I nearly DNF'd this. Then Schulman threw a curveball and suddenly I was riveted. Obviously I won't tell you what it is, and it might have been kind of a cheap trick in another writer's hands, but in this case it made me realize what a good writer Schulman really is.

Somehow she had set the whole thing up so that by the time the shocking event happened, I was invested without even knowing it. An odd compliment, I know, but I cannot deny that after that I didn't want to do anything but read Come with Meand it ended up being a completely satisfying reading experience.

The book is bafflingly flawed. But the sci-fi element the book description promises It seems like the novel should barely hang together, but for some reason, for me it did.

So, yes, Come with Me is ambitious, and it also manages to be vivid and nimble and thought-provoking and engaging. It defied my expectations over and over again, and when it comes to novels I can't think of much I admire more than that. May 08, Emily B rated it it was ok. Throughout reading this book I questioned my enjoyment and wondered if I should continue reading. I did however finish and felt that it was two star novel. There seemed to be a lot of characters, too many for each individuals story and to be Come With Me and mean something.

I felt the teen phone sex was weird and uncomfortable to read and did not add anything to the story. Did anybody else feel this way? For me the Throughout reading this book I questioned my enjoyment and wondered if I should continue reading. For me the ending was not satisfactory but I was glad that the book was finished View all 4 comments.

A very very interesting book - it was a bit tough to get into but once I did, oh my - gives me lots to think about for me and my sons and future generations. As in, if you had paid for it you would have demanded a full refund? Interesting, right? I kept going with this book despite characters who were so off-the-charts in their self-indulgent, precious uniqueness as to be violently annoying a teenager so in love with his girlfriend that they are on Skype 24 hours a day—he brings her to school on his phone and they set a place for her at the dinner table.

Instead, a painful and tragic incident appears out of nowhere—as if Schulman thinks it will redeem the book—and turns the last quarter of the novel into a theater of the absurd.

The synopsis of this book, described as exploring parallel lives in multiple universes, sounded so exciting but the reality was much less. I had to interrupt my reading for a few days and was shocked to realize that I had not retained any details about the story. The characters and plot just did not engage me.

The sci fi aspect could just as easily be described as mildly hallucinatory experiences with pot in a sensory deprivation chamber. But, why bother? The tale is about an unhappy marriage an The synopsis of this book, described as exploring parallel lives in multiple universes, sounded so exciting but the reality was much less. But even at that level, the tale is lacking. I received my copy from the publisher through edelweiss. View all 3 comments. This book tested my patience. On the one hand, I didn't enter into it with any expectations.

Unlike some, I wasn't really sure how much the multiverse aspect would play into the story so I wasn't disappointed when it took a backseat to the marital discord of Amy and Dan. However, there was also a lot here that Come With Me like too much information for the sake of filling pages.

I didn't need a play-by-play of all the ways in which a marriage can fall to the wayside. Nor was I interested in the far too c This book tested my patience. Nor was I interested in the far too codependent relationship of two horny teenagers with far too much time on their hands There were plenty of interesting characters within the book but they were often relegated to the periphery in favor of a random encounter or some dinnertime shenanigan.

While both Kevin Jack's best friend and Amy's "second son" and Marilyn the trans woman eventually play a major role in the arc of the story, neither was fleshed out enough for you to feel connected to them as characters. If anything, they felt like collateral in a story that feels more about a man suffering through a midlife crises as his marriage falls apart. I wanted to love this but it often felt like I was reading a rough draft of a story where the author was still letting it "come"to her: it often seemed to veer off the path completely before returning back to whatever its point was in the first place.

Jan 04, Danielle rated it did not like it Shelves: adult-fictioncontemporaryrape-and-assaultbefore-you-ask-yes-she-is. Like a lot of other reviews, I want to emphasize that while this sounds science-fictiony, it's primarily based in real life. There are some aspects involving technology that doesn't exist, but the multiverse part of the book is much more philosophical "what if I did this instead" instead of actually trying to reverse your life.

What made me realize that I really hated this book was how it centers itself around white people being shitty and not changing. There's a lot that starts to build, but eve Like a lot of other reviews, I want to emphasize that while this sounds science-fictiony, it's primarily based in real life.

There's a lot that starts to build, but everything hits when view spoiler [the older son's friend, who is Chinese, kills himself hide spoiler ] and that kind of sealed it for me. I feel like this is hard to talk about without revealing who the spoiler is about, so I'm just going to say it all: view spoiler [Asian culture and mental health is something that's very important to me, and I really hate the way Schulman wrote it here, especially being a white woman and making the story about a white family.

It's a topic that I think white people aren't qualified to write about, and even though Schulman didn't attempt to develop the characters more than absolutely necessary, it left me with a bad feeling in my mouth, especially because the suicide was used to move the story along.

It really fetishizes trans women when it won't let her just be a character and keeps saying she "was male" and analyzing her body in terms of being able to "pass.

It jumps around to a bunch of perspectives to the point that you have to remind yourself who is who - it would have been much less confusing if they had only stuck with the main family, but even that was still a lot. I wish this book actually had something to say about humanity, especially in its touted multiverses, but all I'm coming away with is that people suck. And the cycle starts again, which isn't something I really believe in.

I guess I'm not the ideal reader of this utterly mediocre novel. I live a couple of streets over from where its protagonists ostensibly live, so I notice whenever Schulman gets her geography wrong. My kids attend the schools it features, so I understand how they don't really function as described. I work in the two industries she writes about journalism and high techwhich brings home the author's tenuous grip on the history and current realities of both.

And lastly, I know the people who liv I guess I'm not the ideal reader of this utterly mediocre novel. And lastly, I know the people who live here and that the last thing they'd want anyone to make of our community's painful experience with a teen suicide cluster would be a facile hook for a piece of fiction. But that's what we get. Worse, a high-achieving, stressed out Asian kid is killed off as a mechanism for a middle-aged white couple to face their banal relationship demons.

Cliche is piled upon cliche, hurt upon hurt, without acknowledgement that this is also racially freighted territory. As an appendix make clear, Schulman's is a book researched mostly through Google and informed by Wikipedia above all, plus an occasional visit with relations who live near by.

It's spectacularly superficial and notices all the wrong things. Just a tiny example: No kid in Palo Alto would be surprised or grossed out by an Asian family serving Asian food at a funeral. Every child here eats dim sum, knows how to use chopsticks, etc. And if they don't, that's the news, not that the host family was somehow gauche in wanting to serve it.

Few of Come To Me 's readers will live in the area it describes, of course although I only picked it up because it's about my town. So what if we forget that the streets, schools, and communities it name checks are real and see the novel's "Palo Alto" as emblematic of the wider, hyper-connected modern world?

After all, the opaque and frankly unbelievable virtual reality technology developed by a major character in the story himself a walking brilliant-but-immature-slob-nerd cliche offers its users a glimpse into alternate universes and all the ways in which their lives might have gone differently. Sadly, just as its protagonists fail to really grapple with the ramifications of what they're inventing, the narrative makes disappointingly little of the futuristic technology - or the counter narratives - that it conjures.

The personal and societal events and inventions it posits - both real and imagined - are momentous there's a whole subplot about the Fukushima earthquake that is woefully underdeveloped in the context of the broader narrative. But its characters' reactions to them are devoid of new or surprising insight.

Perhaps that's a deliberate comment on what little we make of our lives. But it tells us nothing we didn't already know. There's much about Palo Alto that is both typical and strange. I can imagine a novel in which the particular ways in which we go about our lives in this part of the world are both illustrative and revelatory about how people live now.

But you won't find that in the version of our town that Schulman has chosen to describe. As a work of science fiction, this stinks. There's one potentially interesting though devastatingly implausible and painfully underdeveloped piece of future technology, and it makes exactly two appearances of about a page each in this page book.

As a work of literary fiction, this also stinks. I'm over the midlife crisis, doing-pretty-okay family dissolving narrative. Oh, this one is edgy because the woman the cheating husband falls in love with is trans? Get the fuck out of here. Find a new story. All that said, as a combination of literature and sci-fi, this is the worst of all. There's nothing worse than a piece of genre fiction that's unwilling to admit that it's genre, and friends, this is that piece.

In the not too distant future perhaps, people will be able to take that ". And that's one of the central themes of this book. And the first person he gives access to the program is a something emplo In the not too distant future perhaps, people will be able to take that ".

And the first person he gives access to the program is a something employee who is his mom's best friend. As far as a literary tool, she's a good candidate for two reasons: she's old enough to have had a life in which roads were taken and she's not young enough to be jaded by tech advancements.

A baby-boomer like me loves stories like this even though, or because, it sometimes feels like the young in the book are speaking a foreign language and yet it's somehow comprehendible so it's satisfying. I find myself thinking, " Ah, yes! This is what youth is about now! The only thing I didn't care for in this book is the title. You'd think with all that going on, she could have thought of a better title.

It's a minor gripe in an otherwise great book. Picked this up because the sci-fi multiverse synopses sounded like a wild time. Instead, I got a book about a marriage that is struggling with almost no speculative elements.

There's a point toward the end where one of the characters is reading Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials. Sadly, this only made think how much more effectively Pullman addresses many of the same ideas that Come With Me takes on: questions about free will, the role of choice and the role of chance, the possibility of different worlds existing alongside the one we know.

Why did one book take my emotions hostage, make the hair stand up on the back of my neck, make me stay up Come With Me late, while another There's a point toward the end where one of the characters is reading Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials.

Why did one book take my emotions hostage, make the hair stand Come With Me on the back of my neck, make me stay up too late, while another one just made me say, Hmmm, that's interesting?

Every reader is different; we are not all going to like the same things. But I did not feel moved by the plight of these characters. I did not feel personally involved and swept away as I did when Lyra and Will battled for their lives in an alternative world.

And it's not because one is "magical" and the other is "realistic"; Kate Atkinson, in Life After Life, explores similar themes in a way that is not magical at all but also grabbed me emotionally in a way that Come With Me Never managed.

This book interested me enough to put other books aside and read it in a matter of days but it left me feeling arid and unmoved. The character I was most concerned about was the dog, even though he was not given much of a personality, Come With Me.

It seemed like the sort of book where something awful would have to happen to the dog. Fortunately I was wrong about that.


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  1. Nov 27,  · COME WITH ME is an imaginative story of a couple raising three children in the uber competitive techdom of Silicon Valley where new companies are created as fast as lattes are made, start ups are run by Stanford students who are still on meal plans, families just trying to do their best, and endless love and affection abounds.3/5(48).
  2. Sep 05,  · “Come with me,” the girl tells the boy across the hall. Walking together, one step at a time, the girl and the boy begin to see that as small and insignificant as their part may seem, it matters to the world/5(62).
  3. Come With Me, Helen Schulman’s sixth novel, is a feat of both craft and storytelling. On the surface it is about a suburban family: the parents, Amy and Dan, are dealing with middle-age ennui, midlife unemployment, and marital resentments, their adolescent son Jack is navigating long distance love and hometown friendships, and Theo and Miles 3/5.
  4. Waylon Jennings "Come With Me": If you're in a valley, with a troubled mind I'm a mountain, come on and climb Because you look so go Waylon Jennings - Come With Me Lyrics | luttrolterpmaslaystepovusletseipratin.coinfo A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z #.
  5. Come with me and you'll be In a world of pure imagination Take a look and you'll see Into your imagination We'll begin with a spin Traveling in the world of my creation What we'll see will defy.
  6. "Come with Me Now" is a song by South African American band Kongos. Initially released to iTunes in December as a single from their album Lunatic, "Come with Me Now" earned commercial success in the United States in , eventually peaking at number one on the Billboard Alternative Songs chart and becoming their first charting single in the United States.
  7. May 03,  · Come With Me: Discovering the Beauty of Following Where He Leads - Kindle edition by Eller, Suzanne, Cushatt, Michele. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Come With Me: Discovering the Beauty of Following Where He Leads/5().
  8. May 03,  · Come With Me: Discovering the Beauty of Following Where He Leads - Kindle edition by Eller, Suzanne, Cushatt, Michele. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Come With Me: Discovering the Beauty of Following Where He Leads/5().
  9. Jan 11,  · Come With Me Lyrics: Oh no no / I know you think it ain't my place, to say how I feel / But I'm going to say it anyway, cause I gotta keep it .

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